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to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time, the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inseparable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today, congressman, was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions that was made by mandela and other anc leaders and other antiapartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough. they had been committed to nonviolence in the way that you have been so overtly committed to nonviolence, throughout your life, throughout those struggles, even in the face of incredible physical brutality, and they decided when they saw those people massacred, they needed some kind of military response as well. never ended up being a key response of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how interna
[inaudible] prepares forfrica a state funeral of unprecedented proportions, what kind of nation mr. mandela leaves behind. is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. lson mandela went to prison and a great young man. committed to letting his enemies by violence if necessary. byfighting as enemies violence if necessary. 27 years later he emerged preaching. can say withf you authority and confidence that i have traveled this long road to freedom. fight, i madenot missteps along the way. [inaudible]e cross.y more hills to >> his longtime collaborator archbishop desmond tutu gave ask for a friend and global icon. >> thank you for the gift of madiba. him andu for watching enable us to know what we can become. >> for decades of struggle. the system applied violence and racist ideology in equal measure to oppress south africa's black majority and keep the white elite in power. but having won the battle he shared hiseid, victory with his former oppressors. >> his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis which he has always put
a state funeral of unprecedented proportions, what kind of nation mr. mandela leaves behind. is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. lson mandela went to prison and a great young man. committed to letting his enemies by violence if necessary. byfighting as enemies violence if necessary. 27 years later he emerged preaching. can say withf you authority and confidence that i have traveled this long road to freedom. fight, i madenot missteps along the way. [inaudible]e cross.y more hills to >> his longtime collaborator archbishop desmond tutu gave ask for a friend and global icon. >> thank you for the gift of madiba. him andu for watching enable us to know what we can become. >> for decades of struggle. the system applied violence and racist ideology in equal measure to oppress south africa's black majority and keep the white elite in power. but having won the battle he shared hiseid, victory with his former oppressors. >> his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis which he has always put on the need for reconcilia
his long captainity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed s
that mr. mandela brought about in south africa. my visit with him in '96, i had the privilege of spending nearly an hour with him in his office in south africa. the thing that struck me the most about mr. mandela, when you are in the presence of someone viewed by his countrymen as george washington, abraham lincoln and martin luther king it's intimidating. the thing that struck me is how open and engaging and humorous he was. we had a great time talking and laughing. i said to myself, an icon should not be this happy and laughing. you know, i expected a stone figure and i found a very -- >> doctor, can you reflect on how nelson mandela impacted those that you managed during your tenure at universities like howard? >> caller: sure. i was president of howard for 13 years. during that time, prior to my becoming president, mr. mandela received an honorary degree from howard. it was the first honorary degree he received from an american university. we are proud of that. mr. mandela, when i visited with him reminded me of his visit to washington and howard. he asked a question whether or not th
africa. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> one excludes the religious leaders, mr. mandela is the greatest person to have walked the face of the earth in human history. >> reporter: an icon not only for his fellow countrymen -- >> viva mandela! viva! >> reporter: -- but for the entire world. "nelson mandela." >> ladies and gentlemen. >> this is "headliners "headliners & legends" with lester holt. >> he is lauded the world over as a man of peace, a champion for the downtrodden. he suffered at the hands of racism and endured decades in prison only to emerge with his dignity intact, his spirit unbroken freedom fighter, ex-prisoner, nation builder. nelson mandela's legacy serves as a shining example not only for the people of the world today but for generations to come. >> reporter: nelson mandela's life begins far away from the turmoil, struggles and ultimate triumphs that will define his life. here in the transsky province of south africa, 550 miles south of johannesburg, mandela is born on july 18th, 1918. the name he is given will prove in a sense prophetic. >> nelson mande
, actually the marque was a big part of it. it said welcome home mr. and mrs. mandela. there were a huge crowds here, more than 100,000 people, there was a huge parade. a lot of people we spoke to today found out about his death as they were leaving work, and seeing this marque. and for people here, his sit sit brought a bit of hope. a lot of people remember him riding by is pointing at the apollo theater. he just mentioned how his visit game hope. people just appreciated him making the stop, when he could have stop sod many other places. so certainly sadness, and a lot of fond memories coming from the people that were here those years ago. so jonathan -- what else is expected -- are there any events expected to happen at the apollo tonight? >> well, not tonight, like i said -- you just have started here. people are finally just stopping by, many people sharing memory as lot of people have stopped by to speak to us, and say i remember back in 1990 that we were standing -- we were here on top of the marque. some people remember being -- really at this point no sort of planned memorial, or
the prime minister of new zealand, john key wrote, mr. mandela was a force for change not only in south africa, but around the world. reacting tonight, muhammad ali wrote, his was a spirit born free. destined to soar above the rainbows. today his spirit is soaring through the heavens. he is now forever free. new york's cardinal dolan wrote, nelson mandela was a hero to the world. his bravery in defending human rights against the great evil of apartheid made him a symbol of courage and dignity as well as an inspiration to people everywhere. and mandela's great friend, archbishop foundation wrote in his name his fearless generosity and leadership were in the service of transcending our differences by seeking our oneness as human beings. and here's the "new york" magazine cover, a tribute to the young mandela, young freedom fighter. tonight, bono, mandela's great supporter and friend wrote, in the end, nelson mandela showed us how to love rather than hate, not because he never surrendered to rage or violence but because he learned love would do a better job. >> andrea mitchell in our d.c.
with us. mr. mandela's death comes at a period of deep unease, writes the new york tiles. the past year and a half, the country faces the most serious unrest provokeed by a wave of angry miner, a deadly response on part of police, messy leadership struggle and deepening fishers between south africa's ruler masters. members of the party have said mr. mandela's near saintly legacy from years of struggle has been eroded by a scramble of self enrich. . nelson mandela died with his family around him at a hospital. it was brought to us by the south african president. he was born in transic south africa. he moved to end the regime. the impact of his efforts reconciled generosity and to find the common ground between humanity's higher values and his own power. john carlin once described him and said he'll ultimately reach beyond south africa's borders. this coming to us from black borders. prior to doing so, mandela earned a bachelor's degree during which time he was elected onto the student's representative council and suspended from college for joining a protest boycott. he was eququalified i
mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to remember nelson mandela who changed the world by committing his to the freedom of the south african people. >> i have nothing but deep gratitude they have given to me as an individual and let me state this. they were able to achieve anything, i know that this is because i am the servant of the people of south africa. >> it has been more than two decades since nelson mandela walked out of prison, but for those who lived through it, it seemed to be a piece of a larger puzzle. consider when mandela was freed, we were less than a year removed from china's tianamen square. the berlin wall came down the previous november. it was a fleeting moment in history, but for a time it showed humanity around the world was headed in the righ
in johannesburg. byron? >> reporter: it's a bit loud here on the street outside of mr. mandela's home. people singing songs and chants from the movement mr. mandela lead here decades ago. all day long here, a steady stream of humanity, as people have shown up, sometimes entire families. here, we show their last respect to the man this entire nation so adored. as the world mourns the death of nelson mandela through song, dance and tears, details about his grand state funeral are coming out. >> we should all work together to organize the most befitting funeral. >> reporter: beginning tomorrow with a national day of prayer and reflection, for south africa. with an official service on tuesday in johannesburg, where thousands are expected to gather at the fnb stadium, the same stadium where mandela made his last public appearance during the 2010 world cup. the services are expected to be the largest in generations, with prominent leaders and dignitaries from across the globe attending, including president obama and the first lady, who travel to south africa next week, to pay respects, bringing alo
courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching live pictures of him being celebrated in the streets of johannesburg. died in the suburbs of johannesb
square. mr. mandela's host on that day was the mayor of bedford, councillor carole ellis. sadly, councillor ellis is seriously ill at present, but i know that she is so proud of her own and of bedford's part in mr. mandela's story. between 1986 and 1990, the right honorable gentleman member for bermondsey and old southwark , i and peter pike, the former member for burnley, made three visits to south africa at the invitation of the followers of christ working for a peaceful resolution of the situation there. on our return from our first visit, on june 17, we made joint speeches in a debate here in the house of commons, referring to each other as our honorable friends -- a point duly noted by hansard. we had gone together -- safety in numbers -- at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation was deteriorating, violence was abroad, and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything but very polarised information. we were able to report back to our respective party leaders on what we found. i had half an hour with an anxious, worried, an
that lined auburn aven. that was a very sad occasion. when mr. mandela came to atlanta it was a happy joyous occasion for people of atlanta and really certainly for people of our nation and around the world. >> how do you cope while everyone else is mourning? >> i think what we are sad about is the loss at the same token the confr contribution to the ws so incredible. he is now in a better place as we see in the christian tradition. he has gone home to rest with god. he has paid far more duce t duer world community than the average individual would be able to. and for that we are so thankful for this dignified leadership of nelson mandela. >> talk about the similar traits you see between your father and nelson mandela. >> i would say if we talked about various traits of nelson mandela and martin luther king jr. they both unrelenting. >> my dad was unrelenting and mr. mandela was unrelenting for his fight for justice and there are par parallels in those particular areas my dad used his voice to represent the poor and oppressed. president mandela used his voice to represent the poor and oppres
of the congressional black caucus and other circles as they have been noting tonight, lots of concerts in support of mr. mandela, lots of concerts in support of those who said that we should not have any dealings with south africa as long as apartheid was still in place. >> the people for sanctions were on the right side of history because it really did weaken the regime and probably brought them to the bargaining table much quicker. >> in your article, you noted south africa's economic and clinical aspects were intertwined. how so? how did he help to narrow that defined? had growth rates under 1% during the entire apartheid regime. from the time he was a like did until 2008 they were clipping along. that is an astonishing miracle and away. he did that by saying we want free markets. we will not nationalize the minds. we want everyone to be able to sort of compete in our economic system and to take heart. and theyted jobs opened up the labor force. they had a very strong affirmative action program which has worked very well there. they managed to get a lot of people. >> let's talk a little bit about hi
klerk made a historic announcement. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> teichner: a moment forever seared into our memory. after more than a quarter century behind bars, nelson mandela stepped into the light. >> amandla! >> teichner: mandela at 71 emerged looking not like a broken prisoner, but like a king. >> he had won. but mandela is famous for his smile, but that smile is not there. and i believe he was deeply aware of the enormous challenge and responsibility that now lay on him. ♪ >> we will reach the goal of liberating the black people of this country within our lifetime. >> teichner: nelson mandela was free, but the fight for freedom was far from over. >> pelley: when we come back, "60 minutes'" bob simon reflects on mandela's journey from prisoner to president. honestly, i'm not looking for five-star treatment. i get times are tight. but it's hard to get any work done like this. then came this baby -- small but with windows and office. it runs my work stuff. ...and i can use apps like flipboard for news, or xbox video to wat
people to hold daily protests at the south african embassy in washington. >> mr. mandela has had global action. you cannot be shocked and cannot be sad. >> reporter: south african ambassador to the us received the news from zinzi, mandela's daughter. >> she knows how important the united states is to the mandela family and south africa, because it was here that so much happened where people marched for our freedom, were arrested for our freedom, and that is why that statue is there. >> his ideas will live on and never die. >> reporter: people are meeting inside the embassy planning on events in the district to pay a property tribute to nelson mandela. at the south africa embassy, saray, wusa 9. >> if the national cathedral agrees there will be a memorial service there on wednesday. the condolence book is going to be open to the public daily, and there will also be nightly vigils from 7:00-8:00 p.m. at the embassy. >> in the audience, it was electrifying. people were cheering, just about every word that he said about his experience, and the way in which there was that parallel between
. >>> and president barak obama paid his respects tog during a televised event. he credits mr. mandela with his first political action company against apartheid. this is some of what mr. obama had to say. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to forward the dpl that he set to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make to strive for a further worthy of his sacrifice. >> well, one of nelson mandela's biggest supporters was archbishop desmond tutu. he presided over a church service in capetown to remember his friend a short time ago. these pictures coming into us about 30 minutes ago and people listening to mr. tutu's every word about his friend. archbishop tutu also released a statement saying, we quote, over the past 24 hour years madiba taught us how to come together and to believe in ourselves and each other. he was a unifier from the moment he walked out of prison. we are relieved that his suffering is over, but our relief is drowned by our grief. may he rest in peace and rise in glory
was interviewed by ted koppel on night line and ted koppel leaned in and said, mr. mandela, the communist. they were the only ones that helped us. next question. >> you're talking about the controversial part, that he aligned himself with revolution areas like fidel castro, gaddafi and was briefly a member of the communist party. as you write about that in the book, he transcended that when he became president. he certainly didn't seem to follow -- and such. how did he do that? how did he transcend that? >> he believed so deeply in his cause. keep in mind what apartheid was like. here he had a small white minority that controlled the fast population and assets. south africa is a beautiful country with many, many assets. it was terrible what was going on there. i visited south africa more than once. i was there, my bride and i, and a small delegation from our administration. we were there in '91 as a guest. >> you met them there. you talk about the bitterness and lack of anger. he didn't go after his opponents. he started truth and reconciliation. >> isn't that something? truth and reconci
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south africa before she left office, but he wanted to participate. he wanted to know more about how we ran campaigns here. he wanted to be part of the celebration, because he had a great deal of respect. and i was with my friend yolanda caraway to escort him to the inaugural ball. he wanted to see the city. >> former president clinton -- tweeted i'll never forget my friend madeiba, and you can see the love there. david cameron, the prime minister of britain is now speaking. i think we're going to try to fix that audio. once we do, we'll hear david cameron, the british prime minister. he's paying his respects over in london right now once we've fixed that technical problem, we'll hear what he has to say. he's paying his respects. i want to show our viewers some video. february 11th, 1990. right now a very, very special
was given to a meeting with mandela at the hospital, but even then, he was far too frail and mr. obama huddled instead with the family inside this compound. then brought him to the prison. mr. obama referred to mandela by his south african name of endearment. madiba. >> madiba's words give us a compass in a sea of change. >> with mandela's passing, the president said others must now hold his moral compass. >> it falls to us as best we can to form the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make, to strive for a future worthy of his sacrifice. >> president obama will travel to south africa for services for mandela and is expected to be one of many world leaders asked to eulogize the political prisoner who became president. >> colin powell witnessed an historic moment when mandela was sworn in. mandela's leadership that day set his country on a path to unity and inspired the world. the former secretary of state is in washington. general powell, good morning. >> good morning, charlie, how are you? >> remembe
for the memorial service. some other world leaders who plan to attend for mr. mandela are the u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon, david cameron, prince charles is going. the french president, francois hollande and even the cuban president, as we said he had ties with cuba in the past, raul castro, list goes on and on of dignitaries. >> of course, with president obama and three of his predecessors going to south africa, you can imagine what robin was talking about, and that is security and the kind of complex situation they're dealing with potentially a nightmare. secret service had very little time to prepare for the trip. athena jones is joining us at the white house. we're very much aware of what it takes. there's not a lot of advance work when you have the limited amount of time. air force one expected to touch down what, early tomorrow morning? >> early tomorrow morning. i think about 1:00 a.m., they'll be making a fuel stop on the way. bottom line, these are the kinds of trips that take weeks and months to prepare. this was compressed into a very short time line. the spokesman for the s
, mr. mandela." he said "the name is nelson. welcome." so we became friends. >> reporter: for 18 of the 27 years he s:e mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of this walk there was no freedom, there was this. an eight foot square cell with a mattress on the floor for his bed and a bucket for a toilet. mandela was allowed one visitor a year for half an hour. mandela and daniels were among 30 political prisoners isolated in what was simply called "b" block. >> we sat on the brick. >> reporter: mandela and his fellow inmates worked long days in the yard sitting on bricks ordered only to look straight ahead they smashed slate into gravel with hammers. black inmates wore short pants in all weather. the apartheid regime's way of reminding them that all black men were considered boys no matter what their age. the yard is now just another stop on the robben island tourist route. but no visitor can imagine what it meant to eddie daniels when his jailors allowed the "b" block prisoners in the yard one night after six years being locked in by sun set. >> i looked up and
government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half
and tragic news. we're just reminded what an extraordinary and inspiring man mr. mandela was. >> david cameron said he was a hero of our time. >>> no one claiming responsibility yet for killing an american teacher in libya. someone shot and killed ronnie smith as he was jogging near the american consulate in benghazi. smith taught chemistry at an international school there. he was killed five days after an al qaeda group called on libyans to attack american interests to avenge u.s. special forces taking an al qaeda suspect in tr tripoli in october. >>> this gym teacher in loudoun county will not be in school today. gregory winchin is on leave. a staffer at cedar lane he wi elementary in ashburn thought he was acting strange during class yesterday. deputies arrested him for alcohol possession on school property and driving u the influen influence. students were never in danger. >>> the loudoun county sheriff's department is look iing for the person responsible for a reported burglary and assault. police say it happened in the university station area of ashburn around 4:30 yesterday. app
main soccer stadium. mr. mandela's remains will be on view to the public in pretoria beginning wednesday before being moved to the village of kun, where he grew up, where next sunday nelson mandela will be laid to rest. as for this sunday, countless americans here at home are reflecting on nell san mandela's legacy. wand that in mind we turn to bob schieffer in washington for look what's ahead on "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning, charles. we're going to talk to the poet mya angelo about the epic poem she has written to mark the passing of nelson mandela. >> osgood: we'll be watching. next week, here on "sunday morning." >> never so alive -- thank you. >> osgood: the real tale of charles dickens. >> you get the sense of furious energy in a way. man who can't stop. >> osgood: with actor ray finnes. anything we purchase c we leave you this sunday back in south africa at cougar national park. i'm charles osgood. please join us again next "sunday morning" until then i'll see you on the radio. know the feeling? copd includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. spiriva is
to announce that mr. nelson mandela will be released on sunday the 11th of february at about 3:00 p.m. >> so it was. february 11th, 1990, nelson mandela walked free. his wife at his side. ♪ black south africa erupted in orgy of celebration. >> we begin in south africa where it is welcome home day for nelson mandela. >> good morning, charlie. nelson mandela has been in johannesburg for about 18 hours but his real homecoming when he arrived in soweta in a town he hasn't seen nor 27 years. >> looking back, amazing scenes. the astonishing pictures, four years later in 1994 when fights stood with blacks in line to vote in south africa's first nonracial election, to elect nelson mandela, president. >> he wins them over. he seduces them. >> the book "playing the enemy" was turned in to the movie. there is no better example of how he seduced all races than the day south africa beat new zealand in the 1995 rugby world cup final. >> goal. >> rugby had been the white man's sport. the green jersey a symbol of apartheid for blacks. but here was south africa's first black president being cheered as he w
when he came in 1990 it was a big part of the visit. it said welcome home mr and mrs nelson mandela. one of the people who remembered that was the historian, mr billy mitchell. we talked about what that day was like in his memory. >> he was fully aware that all the people from civil rights fighters and to have his preps here, it meant a lot to all of us coming up out of problems. we were going through housing, education, things that of nature. his presence made us feel good, that there is hope. if this man could spend it that much time in prison and never gave in, so, of course, that would be reflected in the community that he was visiting. we were so positive by him being here, that there's nothing we can't do. >> tonight we have seen a lot of people stopping buy to share stories along each other. a few gathering under the apollo marquee. people have brought pictures by. a lot of pictures sharing memories of that day. so many people came by to see him. >> thank you very much. we are doing to take a break, but we'll look at nelson mandela's fight against apartheid coming up. convers
:00. >>> there is mr. nelson mandela a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> south africa and the world mourns the loss of a hero and an icon. nelson mandela was 95. he spent decades fighting apartheid in his native south africa. >> i'm anne makovec live in the newsroom. as the world remembers mandela, we here in the bay area remember his-historic visit to the east bay and congressional legislation and divesting in south africa. >> reporter: bundle up. it is still cold out here. i'm kiet do. we have a live report. >>> yeah, freezing temperatures again around the bay area. freeze warnings are up. what a chilly day. this is the third day in a row of freezing temperatures showing up outside. some of those numbers dropping off under clear skies this morning into the 20s and 30s. now 23 in santa rosa. 28 in concord. 39 in san francisco. and 30 degrees in livermore. so a very cold start to the day again freeze warnings until 9:00. then clouds roll in in the middle of the day. plan on highs only in the 40s and 50s. this afternoon we could see a little rain. and then tonight, cold
. every day here in south africa, until mr. mandela is finally laid to rest. >> a man who changed the world. >>> our ron claiborne has covered nelson mandela extensively throughout the years. >> ron has had many experiences and memories. and is here with a personal take on the story. >> when you cover a story or a person, it requires professional detachment. we're supposed to stand back, observe and report. for nelson mandela, it was difficult for me personally, because something kept getting in the way. the fact that i admired the man deeply. the first time i saw nelson mandela was at yankee stadium in 1990. six months after he had been released from prison. i was in awe, probably we all were. but then he did something that charmed all of us. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee. >> reporter: as a college student, i read about this man serving a life sentence for fighting against apartheid. i was fired up by the slogan, free mandela. years later, at abc, i traveled to south africa to embezzle his birthplace and qunu, where he you up as a small child. and where he will be burie
into south africa, and we went in to have a conversation with mr. mandela. it was a true honor to watch both incredible minds exchanging and talking about both the past and the present. it was a very inspiring moment. you could see in that moment incredible wisdom and at the same time the incredible charm, his smile and laugh that inspired people around the world. >> ambassador gibbs, when you spent time as ambassador to south africa, can you describe how powerful nelson mandela's legend and legacy were were when it came to talking with members of the south african government? >> i think everyone in south africa, from those who knew him personally to those whose lives had been shaped by the legacy he left were so inspired by the example he set. it's a challenge for all of us, and i think the lesson i hope people will take away from his life is that we all can rise above our differences. i think south africa is still working to live up to the incredible example that he set. i think all of us around the world need to live up to that example in a time whether we are divided by political party,
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
to former south african president nelson mandela. he passed away last thursday at the age of 95. mr. mandela serve as south africa's first black president from 1994 to 1999. he spent 27 youth in prison before he was elected president. >> the house will wish to know how we intend to proceed today. defense questions will be postponed to next monday. the present list of questions will be carried over. there will not be another shuffle to the table office will announce consequential changes shortly. this is a special day for special tribute to a special statesmen, nelson mandela. i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. tributes may continue until 10 p.m. there will be no end of day adjournment debate. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela, taking place in westminster hall at 2 p.m. on thursday december 12. i call the prime minister. >> thank you, mr. speaker. nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime, a pivotal figure in the history of south africa and the world,
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison nelson mandela walked into freedom, against all odds the leader of rebellion against south africa's white apartheid government became the leader of national unity. mandela's decades long rebellion transformed him from a convicted trader into a freedom fighter and international hero. >> i have fought very firmly against apartheid on the nation. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family. he support -- into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence to bring about change. he became a lawyer and opened the first south african law firm to defend blacks who were forced from their land, but in 1960 mandela turned militant when 69 black protesters were massacred. >> many use fear, but it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela lived up to his tribal name troublemaker repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. he wa
one of its great moral leaders. >> despite his long years of captivity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them fir
of dignity for the african decent. his long walk to freedom, mr. mandela's constant fight for equality personified what my father often said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. we showed briefly a second ago in new york city the apollo theatre marquis honors mandela. mayor bookberg announced he'll open a high school in honor of mandela. how much impact do you think mandela's life and times have on the civil rights movement and certainly during '80s and '90s when advocates demanded sanctions against apartheid in south africa. >> how much did it have? >> how much did it raise the credibility? >> tremendously. the fact the united states came on board. fortunately the united states came on board. it might have been a little late some would say. if you looked at other country they had come on board much earlier. what the united states did, students and universities started to say we want to divest our holdings in south africa. that was huge. when you impact a nation economically, then the community has to pay attention. business had to pay attention and say maybe these pol
of the united states,. the photograph was taken when mandela visited washington in 2005. and mr. obama was then a brand-new united states senator from illinois. here was mr. obama's reaction late today to the death. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. through his dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. >> pelley: president obama used the word modiba an honorary tightle that translates at father. major garrett at the white house tells us this evening mr. obama plans to attend the state funeral in south africa. that is likely to be in about ten days. nelson mandela will be remembered as a man who emerged from a tiny village to become a defining figure of our time. he was born on july 18th, 1918 in a village called mvezo. his mother named him holy sashava meaning troublemaker, but later a teacher renamed him nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 2
.org and thrive. >>> there is mr. monodell la, mr. nelson mandela, a freeman taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> extraordinary moment, nelson mandela freed after 27 years in captivity. four years later, the first black president in south africa stepping down after five years. his retirement was busy working for world rights, world peace and working for aids and charity. richard branson joins me. richard, you knew nelson mandela over the course of many years and worked on nonprofits together. his sense of compassion to me is something i always found extraordinary, his ability to not have hate in his heart for those who oppressed not on him but generations of black south africans. >> it was absolutely remarkable, and i think something that other nations should learn by. i mean, 27 years in prison, not just himself but hundreds of black activists, many people like steven b. comb, you know, killed horribly and decide to forgive those people, and they set up truth and reconciliation courts where those people have to come to apologize to the relatives of those people that they might h
nelson mandela. > >> your realtime captioner is mrs. linda m. macdonald >>> tributes are pouring out around the world for nelson mandela. a look back at what granted a bay area a visit from the leader. >> and the game changing break in a cold case that led police to a suspect nearly 20 years after a bay area teen's disappearance. >> freezing temperatures and a storm we'll talk about that coming up. >> the roads look good heading into and out of san francisco but some of our travel times ar building. >>> i'm michelle griego. >> hi, everyone. i'm frank mallicoat. it's nearly 5:30. kiet do is freezing in san jose right now. tgif, kiet! >> reporter: enjoying use that term loosely. there's not a lot of frost to knock off your car but check it out. it's actually coming off pretty easy just a light brushing with your hand. it's not going to be so bad going to work. for some businesses, though, the cold weather is profitable. >> the temperature is dropping and that means cold, hard cash. at pelican rocking in walnut creek sweaters are selling briskly. >> sales jumped over 500% on sweaters an
overlapped. when mr. clinton got caught up in scandal mandela visiting the white house stood by him saying our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. recently we asked mr. clinton about their special bond. >> you met with nelson mandela more than any president. and i wonder what was your relationship in those days? >> well, we became good friends. i met him, ironically in 1992 i met him at the democratic convention in new york when i was being nominated for president. we had business to do. they were one of the countries that voluntarily gave up their nuclear arsenal. and in the process of that we became good personal friends. we used to do business together on the phone where their time difference was so great i would take the call at night. and it wasn't too late mandela would make me go get chelsea every time he called and he would talk to her and ask her if she was doing her homework. he was an enormous help to me during every difficult time i had as president. and he did it all, interestingly enough while he never stopped being president of south africa. so if his country h
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
. mr. obama said of mandela what was said of another great emancipator, abraham lincoln: "he belongs to the ages." mandela's legacy, the president said, is a free south africa at peace with itself, an example to the world. for cbs news, i'm scott pelley. good night. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, [ female announcer ] for those who love sweets your season is here. let's just call it the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine and when hands get messy, quite surely they'll say, yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life.
by the french president, francois hollande, which will pay to do to nelson mandela. the order has been changed because the head of the south african delegation, the foreign minister, will be speaking, as will the president of the african union commission, who happens to also be south african. mrs. zuma will be talking about nelson mandela. there will be probably a minute of silence. the french president also announcing that he will attend the funeral of nelson mandela in south africa. i have talked to several presidents this morning who all paid tribute to nelson mandela and said there was a need for them to do their best for the toure of africa as a tribute nelson mandela. >> once the leaders get down to business, what exactly is the goal of the summit? >> the goal of the summit, according to the french president, is to make sure that africans can handle their own security, which means better armies, better coordination, better intelligence sharing. this is a tall order because just as leaders are gathering, french troops are being deployed in the central african republic. this shows how much
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
admirerers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela -a pact was felt arou >>> your realtime captioner is mrs. linda m. macdonald. >>> world leaders and millions of admirers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela, a man whose impact was felt around the globe including right here in the bay area. good afternoon, i'm michelle griego. a day after the death of nelson mandela, much of the world has paused to reflect on his legacy and also his accomplishments. cbs reporter tara mergener is live in washington with more. >> reporter: mandela was an international icon. today millions are mourning his passing and celebrating his remarkable life. the flag is after half-staff at the south african embassy in washington. outside his home in johannesburg, mourners are gathering to remember the man they called madiba. a memorial service will be held tuesday and the outpouring of love says something with the caliber of the man who led the country out of apartheid. >> we'll always love madiba for teaching us that it is possible to overcome hatred and anger to build a new nation. >> reporte
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